fbpx

SUBURBAN VIBES IN SUBIACO Meet the artists bringing the vibes


For nine days this month, local musicians will take over venues across Subiaco for the inaugural Suburban Vibes in Subiaco, running from Friday, October 8 until Saturday, October 16. The lineup includes a diverse blend of popular live acts encompassing everything from indie, folk, jazz, electronic and more, with the full program out now at seesubiaco.com.au. BRAYDEN EDWARDS caught up with a handful of acts playing over the series, including Teischa, Sam Coombes, Kat Wilson and Wild Oak, to find out more about their music and what we can look forward to from their performances. 


TEISCHA

How did you get into playing music and how long have you been playing for?

Playing music was definitely something I unintentionally fell into. Growing up, I wasn’t necessarily super interested in being an artist or having a career in music, I just really enjoyed writing words and documenting my feelings. About five years ago I decided to take music a little more seriously and see where it led me, and I’m forever grateful I gave myself the chance to dive into such a strange but incredibly rewarding world of sharing art.

What artists have influenced your sound the most and why?

Frank Ocean, for his vulnerability and perspective he offers through lyrics; James Blake, for his boundary-pushing sounds; and Alicia Keys, because she is simply an icon.

When people come and watch you play, what do you think they will remember most about you?

I had to ask a friend to help answer this one (laughs). “Brooding, soulful vocals with moody songwriting accompanied by delicate piano playing. Relatable, and guaranteed to make your red wine taste twice as good.” I guess you’ll have to come have a wine at The Corner Gallery on October 8th to find out if they’re lying or not!

What is next in the pipeline for you musically, any further plans for the rest of the year and beyond?

Just staying focused on writing and being creative across different platforms. My brother and I started up our own music studio/creative hub, District 12, this year, which has opened up a completely new view of the music industry for both of us. I’m loving playing roles behind the scenes in helping others create and share their art, as well as having the freedom to experiment with new sounds and avenues for my own project.


SAM COOMBES

How did you get into playing music and how long have you been playing for?

I would say I have been playing guitar for about eight years but only started singing in the last three. I first started busking when I was 16 – just at a local farmers market and from there progressed onto larger markets and events.

What artists have influenced your sound the most and why?

I’m influenced by all sorts but in terms of my sounds I have always looked to artists such as John Butler and Angus & Julia Stone. I think, however, that I’m still developing my style and sound, and lately have been really influenced by artists like Caamp and Gregory Alan Isakov.

When people come and watch you play, what do you think they will remember most about you?

Hopefully they remember my music, but I think people probably remember how different my voice sounds when I talk compared to when I sing.

What is next in the pipeline for you musically, any further plans for the rest of the year and beyond?

I think just getting more of my sounds recorded and expanding my music platform presence. I’m also keen to get out and play up north and further down south.


KAT WILSON

How did you get into playing music and how long have you been playing for?

When I was a teenager my brother had an electric guitar. When he would leave the house I’d sneak into his room and play. My grandma also taught me how to play piano as a child. I’ve been playing these instruments for over 10 years.

What artists have influenced your sound the most and why?

Songwriters influence me the most. The artists that can either tell the most complex story in a few short words or the ones that can elaborate the more boring days to sound like adventures. A few favourites are Sufjan Stevens, Tallest Man On Earth, Paul Kelly, and Joni Mitchell.

When people come and watch you play, what do you think they will remember most about you? 

(Laughs) I get told a lot how it makes people happy because I’m having such a good time on stage so maybe that? Who knows?

What is next in the pipeline for you musically, any further plans for the rest of the year and beyond?

I’m currently recording my debut album so that’s all happening and I’m playing a few fun festivals next year so I’m really looking forward to that. Also planning another WA tour while father Mark keeps our borders shut.


WILD OAK (Answered by Oakley Driscoll)

How did you get into playing music and how long have you been playing for?

I think most of us started playing music in our early teens, and we’ve all played in different bands over the years. Brent and I met a few years back and started playing intimate shows around Perth as an acoustic duo. Fast forward a few years and we’ve broadened our sound to include percussion, welcoming Oli to the band.

What artists have influenced your sound the most and why?

This question stumps us every time! We are still trying to figure out what our sound is, and it’s hard to pinpoint any one artist or genre. We all grew up listening to indie-folk/folk-rock artists such as City and Colour, Ben Howard, Kyle Lionhart and Angus & Julia Stone, so I’d say our folk-influence definitely stems from these artists. I have always been a huge Paramore fan and without realising it, some of those rocky/power ballad melodies are probably inspired by Hayley Williams’ powerhouse vocals. And lastly, we’d have to mention John Mayer, his bluesy, pop/rock guitar licks are insane and you can definitely hear his influence in some of Brent’s acoustic and electric riffs.

When people come and watch you play, what do you think they will remember most about you?

There’s some kind of rawness and vulnerability that is shared at our gigs. Our sets are such a rollercoaster of emotion, we share some really personal stories, then flip it on its head and play something fun and light-hearted to get everyone smiling and dancing. We are all such good mates and I think that really shows on stage. We really try to let the audience get to know us and not just play a show.

What is next in the pipeline for you musically, any further plans for the rest of the year and beyond?

We’ll be spending the next few months recording. We’ve got a heap of new tunes and we’re really excited to start sharing them with you!

Comments are closed.